Nature is free and abundant

(Picture sources: Google)

Nature is free and abundant.

When it rains, Nature provides an umbrella in the form of a banana leaf free of charge.

All of us have equal access to the benefits of Nature.

Nature does not discriminate anyone.

You don’t need to pay anything.

You only need to take care of the environment, and Nature will take care of you.

Conserve the forest, and the forest will preserve you and your posterity.

We and Nature are one and interconnected.

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Why I choose to support Black and indigenous communities

“To be black is to always be in the wrong place at the wrong time because, in America, there is never a right place for black people.”

(“It’s not just Starbucks: White fear is an American problem” by Renee Graham)

I’ve had enough of White fear (and Asian anti-blackness, for that matter).

I need to stop supporting White businesses where possible.

I need to stop seeking validation and approval from Asians.

I respect them as humans but I wouldn’t place my deepest trust in them.

They ultimately care only about themselves.

Most Whites care only about enriching themselves even if they want to sell and market stuff (including culturally appropriated ones) to the world.

Most Asians care only about saving their own faces even if they profess to be altruistic.

The only people who truly care about humanity and the environment are mainly Black people and indigenous peoples living in traditional, sustainable societies.

One cannot profess to love the environment if one is living with a racially discriminating mindset.

One cannot profess to love humanity if one is living an environmentally unsustainable lifestyle.

Both the love for humanity and love for the environment go hand in hand.

Case in point:

White people who claim to love animals and conserve Nature can be downright racist and anti-Black and anti-indigenous peoples.

Ever wonder why wealthy privileged White people are usually the ones who own pet dogs and live in private property close to Nature (after the indigenous peoples have been chased out of their natural habitats and have to live in public housing where they continue to experience structural and systemic racism)?

Furthermore, White people claim to love Nature when they colonise tropical islands such as Bahamas and Seychelles, but they reserve it exclusively for other rich White people by making it expensive for others to stay or visit.

Another case in point:

Asian people who claim to care about people by developing their lands can also be downright racist and destructive to the environment.

For example, Chinese people claim to help Africans develop their economies, but some of them came to poach wildlife and smuggle them out of Africa for profits.

Indigenous peoples in Asia, Americas and Australia are also facing discrimination and marginalisation when they are uprooted and displaced from their homelands and are forced to live in capitalistic cities and adapt to unnatural and unsustainable lifestyles like the rest of the urban crowd.

To my Black sisters and brothers, I am sorry for the way you have been discriminated and marginalised around the world.

We have failed you, and acknowledge you deserve to be treated equally, and you deserve to be credited for paving the way for racial disparity discourses.

P.S. The above are strictly my opinions and do not represent any organisation or country.

P.P.S. I am making some generalisations to prove my points, and my general observations are based on reality as I experience it.

P.P.P.S. This author is a Chinese born in Asia speaking a colonial White people’s language, who is coming to realise his indebtedness and connectedness to Motherland Africa and Africans as well as indigenous peoples.

The big picture by Jason Silva

“There’s a great anecdote about the very first photograph taken of earth from the vantage point of space.

The idea was that this photograph occasioned a profound shift in the understanding of ourselves.

You see, for the first time in human history we could look back at our planet in its entirety and see the big picture.

This provided an ontological awakening, it changed our story, our narrative, it upgraded our self-image and expand our consciousness, new maps for new realities as they say.

Astronauts in orbit call this experience the overview effect.

A boundary-shattering sense of revelation and global interconnectedness where we shake off our petty differences and emerge with a sense of global responsibility, global consciousness, and global citizenship.

Carl sagan’s famous “Pale Blue Dot” film echoed this same idea.

From the vantage point of space, there are no lines dividing nations, no geographic subdivisions, no flags or racial divides or disputed territory.

There is only earth, a single celestial body teaming with life, the womb in which we dwell.

Yet the fact is our historically myopic view, most certainly our limited perspective has resulted in much animosity.

We have all too often organized ourselves into competing hostile tribes subjugating each other for land and resources and misrepresenting the big picture into a story of borders, subdivisions, and dividing lines.

Too much hostility and not enough empathy and compassion.

Cultural differences, religion, tribes, nation, race, these are created expressions and variations that should and could be celebrated.

Instead, they have become symbols that are all too often used to create suffocating boundaries.

They are increasingly ill-conceived to address the challenges of a hyper-connected global world.

As advancements in technology and information enable greater mobility of ideas goods and people, the role of the physical boundary has shifted and due for an upgrade.

Conflicts remain and too many people are restricted access to the increasingly fluid means of migration, transportation, and movement.

Migration has always been a defining factor of the human experience.

Migration has and continues to touch all nations, cultures, and regions, all peoples on the planet.

Migration has been the seed at the heart of thriving societies accelerating the dissemination of knowledge and ideas.

Restricting migration is ultimately like restricting the flow of ideas and much the same way that we don’t tolerate censorship or book-burning we might consider the ways in which restricting the free movement of people can be equally punishing to the idea of human flourishing.

The desire to become a global citizen is human, we all have it and we all share the same goals for safety comfort and prosperity for our families.

Some are fortunate enough to be able to invest in a second residence and citizenship while others are forced to seek asylum for their survival.

Being a global citizen is also about the strong and the wealthy helping the weak and the poor.

As we saw with the global citizen tax initiative, border disputes, conflict zones, armed borders, these are things that persist and need to be addressed.

We need a new story, a new lens with which to address these inconsistencies we need to scale up to unleash a truly global citizenry.

Exchanging ideas, beliefs, goods, and services.

It has been said that empathy rarely extends beyond our line of sight and so perhaps it is by extending our gaze using marvelous new storytelling tools like virtual reality that we can bridge divisions and bring worlds together ushering a form of radical empathy, to see the other as ourselves, where boundaries are dissolved and compassion reigns supreme.

A massive transformation of consciousness a software upgrade for mankind birthing a new kind. ”

– Jason Silva

Introduction to my new website and Facebook group

To all my readers and followers,

Happy New Year. May 2018 be your best year so far.

Recently, I have created a new WordPress blogsite called Jimmy’s evergreen glen and glade. Thank you for reading and following my posts here so far. In future, I will be posting more often in my new blogsite, though I may still post here on environmental issues from time to time.

My new website introduces who I am and what I do for a living; namely writing, editing, photography and video-storytelling.

You are welcome to drop by and read and subscribe to my new blogsite, where I share my life stories, reviews on workshops, and so on.

And if you would like to get free tips on basic writing and editing English, do check out my new Facebook group “Write Better with Jimmy Tan“.

Hope to see you on the other side/site.

Questioning the western colonial perspective in Geography education

Do you know that we study Geography mainly through a Western colonial lens?

Despite many years of Geography education in schools, we are still tackling recurring social and environmental issues around the world.

Poverty, inequality, environmental degradation, climate change – to name a few.

Something must be amiss in the way we approach our understanding of Geography.

How can we address the shortcomings or limitations of our Geography education system and mindset?

Transitional Monsoon rain in Singapore

Yesterday I posted on Facebook about the shift from southwest monsoon to southeast monsoon in Singapore originating from Sumatra, Indonesia. The transition from southwest monsoon in June-July to northeast monsoon in December-January appears to happen around September.

This morning, torrential rain brought by prevailing winds from Sumatra (otherwise known as Sumatra squall) came visiting Singapore again. Though the wind directions in Singapore shown in the weather app by National Environment Agency appear haphazard, the rain seems to be moving from southeast to northwest, as shown below.

How will this knowledge help us?

For me, it can help me plan my route if I want to cycle from the western towards the central or eastern part of Singapore during this time. I can ask myself: Which route shall I take to avoid the brunt of the storm as much as possible? When would be the best time to start my journey?

Two issues on Geography education (in Singapore and UK)

  1. Eurocentrism

As Singapore Geography adopts the Cambridge syllabus, it is inadvertently Eurocentric in many ways.

That means students will be studying Geography through Eurocentric lens. Their understanding would be shaped by Eurocentric upbringing, experiences and perspectives.

While it is somewhat inevitable that we are ethnocentric in our outlook of life, it helps us to be aware of how we perceive cultures that are beyond our personal experiences, so that we don’t impose on our own values and belief systems onto them, and we don’t project our own bias and prejudices onto them.

Students also need to keep in mind not to subscribe stereotypical views about certain countries. For example, a photo of Dhaka, Bangladesh, shows a crowded city on page 72 of the UK geography textbook Interactions, but it doesn’t represent the whole country.

These may be highlights to the world, understandably so, and due to the sheer diversity of people and cultures, some amount of representations and generalisations have to be made, in order to not be overwhelmed by too much information packed into one book.

What do I mean by “Eurocentric”?

“Eurocentric” as in the system and mindset we grew up in, which includes:

  • We are defined and separated by our national and racial identity.
  • We live in a Western-based monetary capitalistic system (as opposed to barter trade etc).
  • We communicate through the medium of English language.
  • We judge what is considered normal through our own culture and lifestyle, eg a life in which we grow up, study, work, get married and retire etc is considered “normal” and mainstream.
  1. Inquiry approach vs Examinations

Therefore, as we seek to tackle Eurocentrism, the enquiry approach comes in as a methodology to ask ourselves why we perceive things as they are, so that we can understand that how we perceive things is a reflection of how we perceive ourselves as we are.

The enquiry approach opens the door to understanding the world wide, so much so that it leaves questions open-ended, to the extent there is no right or wrong answer to every question.

But the challenge is how to do well in exams if we apply the enquiry approach to learning and understanding Geography.

After all, exams is about getting “right” answers and scoring high marks for being able to conform to the norms and standards of the exam papers. Anything that is deemed outside the norms may not get any mark, even if the answers are interesting and insightful.

Late afternoon Sumatra squall

As evening approached on 18 June 2017, Sunday, a late developer of Sumatra squall made its presence felt in Singapore.

Strong winds blowing from southwest brought heavy rain coupled with thunder and lightning, which lasted over an hour. 


“Squall-lines usually occur during pre-dawn and early morning, and are most frequent between the months of April and November. However, squall-lines can occasionally form in the afternoons and move landwards along with the prevailing winds.”
(From Stormy shores: the Sumatras)

Will Kallang River Make It?

kallang river polluted
Kallang River in Potong Pasir. Some flotsam and debris are seen floating on the water on 13 September 2016.

According to an article dated 29 March 2017, Singapore’s Urban Redevelopment Authority’s (URA) has an ambitious plan to turn the areas along Kallang River into a lifestyle hub. The agency is calling on the public to share their feedback on ideas to revitalise the river. Here is a gist of my ideas and aspirations for Kallang River:

First and foremost, the river itself must be clean and conducive to thriving aquatic life, or else no amount of cosmetic changes to the surrounding landscape will do justice to the river.

We cannot solely depend on dredging works in Kallang River that are carried out downstream near Kallang Basin.

Rubbish still occasionally flows into the river from drains in the suburbs such as Toa Payoh and Bishan in the upstream area.

As recent as August 2016, a plethora of unsightly rubbish was seen in Kallang River behind Braddell Road bus depot after a storm, as shown in this website .

Until every effort is made to curb pollution, littering and inconsiderate disposal of waste – whether in the river premises or in the surrounding suburbs – the vision of a vibrant and living Kallang River will remain an elusive dream.

Can we truly see a transformation from “A stagnant, ugly, dirty canal runs through it” to “An active, beautiful, clean river runs through it”?

Time will tell.

Circuses and our evolving consciousness

National Geographic has published an online photo gallery of the Ringling Bros Circus. I don’t remember following Ringling Bros Circus but I vaguely recalled having watched some circus shows on TV when I was younger. In today’s rising consciousness about animal welfare, changing lifestyles and perceptions and so on, it is perhaps understandable that circuses aren’t generally as popular as they were during their heyday.
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One vivid memory I had about circuses though is the book I read when I was in primary school called “Mr Galliano’s Circus” written by Enid Blyton. I remember I was struggling with learning English in Primary 1 or 2, and did not score well in English tests or exams, partly because I wasn’t well read at a young age. When I stumbled upon “Mr Galliano’s Circus” in the school library, I was pleasantly surprised to find that the language level was just right for me at that point in time, and I believe it marked a turning point for me to develop a love for reading story books, thanks to the intriguing premise of the story about a boy called Jimmy (the name sounds familiar) who embarked on an adventure when he got to travel with the circus with his parents.
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I googled about the book and found it interesting that a reviewer wrote the following

“But Mr Galliano’s Circus is also quite subversive. An ordinary family gives up their comfortable suburban life and joins the circus. Ultimately this is a book about freedom and escaping the rat race.”

For all the controversies surrounding circuses, I have to admit that circuses at that point in history probably would have developed from a different set of cultures, values and circumstances than that in the kind of modern societies in which I live. Back in those days, animals from the wild were seen as mysterious and taming wild animals was a wonder for people who grew up all their lives in urban concrete jungles to watch, and the circus life was seen as a source of entertainment and an escapade from the mainstream societal system that didn’t have iPads, YouTube and MTVs for instant entertainment.
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As much as I empathised with the wild animals such as lions and elephants that had to bear the ignominy and inconveniences of being confined in unnatural cages and subjugated to perform circus tricks, I have to understand that the people who grew up being involved in circus life didn’t know much better at that time, and through a rising consciousness about how we are all interconnected, we begin to understand a bit better about ourselves and others, and we begin to make positive changes and learn to make adjustments to create a better, more humane and equitable world…